3 Mistakes people make when writing a press release & how to avoid them

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As a journalist and someone who also runs a niche website, I have received countless emails from small and medium-sized businesses wanting to showcase their wares through a press release.

It's important to remember, that a journalist working on tight deadlines and getting a daily influx of press releases into their inbox is only going to bother with the ones that attract their attention - in a positive way.

I am passionate about helping vegan, ethical and small businesses get into the press, gain amazing publicity for their work, and ultimately make the world a better place. This is why I want to focus on teaching these types of businesses how to write effective press releases, that will actually get opened - and read!

But the work really starts before you even sit down to write the pitch email to introduce your press release...

Here are 3 mistakes that businesses make when writing a press release:

1) They don't really know who to send it to

Yes, it can be time consuming, but you are going to have a far better chance of your press release being properly received if you send it to an actual person rather than a generic email address. Do you research before you click send, and find a specific person to reach out to. 

2) They send too many attachments 

It's best to avoid attaching anything big if you're wanting to get on the right side of an editor or journalist. Instead, simply paste the text of your press release in the body of the email, after your pitch, and do the same for any images that you wish to also include. Attach high-res versions of these images so they can be used if required (explain this is what you've done). This way, the journalist can easily see all the information straight away.

3) They use an email subject that is quirky or clever

I know the temptation is to use something smart or funny to get attention - but the reality is that busy editors simply don't have time to waste on 'intriguing emails'. Keep it simple, so they know what to expect, like starting off with "Press release" and then a summary of the story idea. 

If you'd like more help with creating press releases, sign up to my online, live masterclass on Friday 22 June where I'll be giving you plenty more tips and tricks to make your press releases irresistible! There won't be a replay, so don't miss your spot!

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